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Abolishing the word-length effect

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 authored by C Hulme, A Surprenant, T Bireta, George StuartGeorge Stuart, I Neath
The authors report 2 experiments that compare the recall of long and short words in pure and mixed lists. In pure lists, long words were much more poorly remembered than short words. In mixed lists, this word-length effect was abolished and both the long and short words were recalled as well as short words in pure lists. These findings contradict current models that seek to explain the word-length effect in terms of item-based effects such as difficulty in assembling items, or in terms of list-based accounts of rehearsal speed. An alternative explanation, drawing on ideas of item complexity and item distinctiveness, is proposed.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

30

Issue

1

Start Page

98

End Page

106

Number of Pages

9

ISSN

0278-7393

Location

Washington

Publisher

American Psychological Association

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Not affiliated to a Research Institute; Purdue University; University of York;

Era Eligible

No

Journal

Journal of experimental psychology : learning, memory, and cognition.