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A critical writing pedagogy : who benefits?

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Susan Mcintosh
Teaching literacy practices in a way that domesticates by emphasising form and structure over the political and social nature of writing has been critically analysed in recent years. The question of 'who benefits' from such practices has been implicitly raised in an increasing number of spheres by theorists and researchers whose beliefs stem from a critical literacy perspective. This paper seeks to explore the politics of writing, the representation of self in writing and the use of critical writing practices as an alternative to generic approaches to teaching the academic writing process. Kamler's (2001) strategies for developing a critical writing pedagogy and Halasek's (1999) complementary arguments of viewing writing in a cultural context and repositioning students as co-creators of knowledge will be discussed in the context of an adult university preundergraduate bridging program literacy course whose aim is to ensure that students are the primary benefactors of their writing. Thus the students (the 'researched') can be empowered to share as coresearchers in the research project.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

17

Issue

2

Start Page

152

End Page

163

Number of Pages

12

ISSN

1329-0703

Location

Brisbane, Qld

Publisher

Queensland Institute for Educational Research

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Faculty of Education and Creative Arts;

Era Eligible

No

Journal

Queensland journal of educational research.

Exports

CQUniversity

Exports