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23rd International Symposium on Shiftwork and Working Time: Towards a global consensus

journal contribution
posted on 28.03.2019, 00:00 by Gregory RoachGregory Roach, T Kantermann, Drew DawsonDrew Dawson, Charli SargentCharli Sargent, FM Fischer
The Working Time Society (WTS), and the International Commission on Occupational Health (ICOH) Scientific Committee on Shiftwork and Working Time, are twin organisations focused on conducting research, and informing practice, regarding the impact of work hours in general, and shiftwork in particular, on the efficiency, productivity, safety, well-being, health, and biological rhythms, of employees. Every 2–3 years since 1969, the WTS and ICOH have conducted a series of international symposia in Europe, Asia, Australia, North America, and South America. The purpose of these symposia is to provide a forum for the exchange of knowledge, and the discussion of contested issues, with researchers, employee representatives, regulators, and employers. The most recent symposium in this series–the 23rd International Symposium on Shiftwork and Working Time, entitled “Toward a Global Consensus”–was held on 19–23 June 2017, at Yulara, Australia, near Uluru. Since 2004, Chronobiology International has released a special issue after each symposium, and that tradition continues with a special issue that includes 17 contributions based on a selection of the 128 papers that were presented at the most recent symposium. Here, we provide an overview of the papers that comprise the special issue, and we briefly comment on the implications of the findings for shiftworkers and their employers. © 2018, © 2018 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

History

Volume

35

Issue

6

Start Page

739

End Page

745

Number of Pages

7

eISSN

1525-6073

ISSN

0742-0528

Publisher

Taylor & Francis, UK

Additional Rights

Free Access

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

Yes

External Author Affiliations

University of São Paulo, Brazil; SynOpus, Bochum, University of Applied Sciences for Economics and Management (FOM), Germany

Author Research Institute

Appleton Institute

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Chronobiology International