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‘What did they say?’ : examining the effects of lecturers’ accents in English on the actual and perceptual listening comprehension abilities of international students in a culturally diverse Australian university

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conference contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Alison Owens, Irene Wex
The rapid growth in numbers of international students studying at Australian universities has resulted in a substantial increase in cultural and linguistic diversity within the higher education sector. As a result, the teaching and learning environment has also become culturally and linguistically complex, with many teachers and students now communicating in English as a second language (ESL); hence with accented speech. This small-scope study explored the effects of accented speech on the listening comprehension skills and abilities of ESL students at an international university campus. The students’ written and verbal responses were recorded and, while it may not be possible to generalise from findings based on such a small sample, key issues nevertheless emerged: the perceptual level of difficulty in comprehending accented English may not align with actual comprehension ability for a range of reasons; the degree of proximity between the first language of second language English speakers and listeners may not have a strong effect on enhancing comprehension, and international students' expectations about Australian teachers' accents may not align with the realities of a multicultural community and workforce. Recommendations are subsequently provided on the basis of such indicators to assist universities to develop greater awareness amongst their teachers and learners of the cognitive- and the socio-linguistic issues involved in teaching and learning in English as a second language within an Australian university context.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Parent Title

Eighth biennial national conference of the Association for Academic Language and Learning (AALL) : How do we communicate? 29-30 November 2007, La Trobe University, Melbourne.

Start Page

1

End Page

16

Number of Pages

16

Start Date

01/01/2007

Location

Melbourne, Australia

Publisher

AALL

Place of Publication

Melbourne

Peer Reviewed

No

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Conference; Intercultural Education Research Institute (IERI);

Era Eligible

No

Name of Conference

Association for Academic Language and Learning. Conference

Exports