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Subjective fit with organisational culture : implications for the buffering role of participative control in the stress-strain relationship

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conference contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by C Newton, N Jimmieson
Considerable research has produced mixed results relating to the stress-buffering effects of participative control on employee adjustment. This study proposed that stress-buffering effects of participative control would be more pronounced for those perceiving high, as opposed to low, subjective fit. Three significant interactions were found in a sample of 119 employees. The results revealed a three-way interaction between role conflict, participative control, and subjective fit on intentions to leave. Further analyses found a significant three-way interaction between role overload, participative control, and subjective fit on physiological symptoms and psychological health. In all interactions, participative control buffered the negative effects of the stressors on levels of employee adjustment only when employees’ subjective fit with the organisational culture was high. The theoretical importance of the results is discussed.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Editor

Kennedy J; Di Milia V

Parent Title

Proceedings of the 20th ANZAM Conference [electronic resource] : Management : pragmatism, philosophy, priorities

Start Page

1

End Page

18

Number of Pages

18

Start Date

01/01/2006

ISBN-10

1921047348

Location

Yeppoon, Qld.

Publisher

Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management

Place of Publication

Lindfield, NSW

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Faculty of Business; International conference; School of Psychology;

Era Eligible

No

Name of Conference

Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management. International conference

Exports

CQUniversity

Exports