cqu_5051+SOURCE2+SOURCE2.2.pdf (216.2 kB)

Role models for choice of academic discipline at university

Download (216.2 kB)
conference contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Jessie Kennedy, J Drennan, P Renfrow, B Watson
Role models are considered important in career development (Hackett and Betz, 1981), but the range of role models adopted in making academic and vocational decisions is not well researched (Nauta and Kokaly, 2001), although there is some evidence of the impact of role models, such as in changes in attitudes to non-traditional careers (Evans and Whigham, 1995). This study analyses the role models identified by a large cohort of students studying first-year courses at the University of Queensland. A questionnaire was completed in class by 1075 students across six faculties, in which they identified role models for their choice of academic program and indicated whether the role model was of the same sex, and whether it was a positive or negative role model. The number and types of roles models identified for each discipline of study is presented. Analysis of the data indicates that both males and females identify more role models of the same sex than of the opposite sex, except for women entering male-dominated fields of engineering and information technology. Women have more positive role models than men for career choices.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Start Page

1

End Page

9

Number of Pages

9

Start Date

13/11/2003

Finish Date

14/11/2003

ISBN-10

1876674660

Location

Rockhampton, Qld.

Publisher

Women in Research, Central Queensland University

Place of Publication

Rockhampton, Australia

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Era Eligible

Yes

Name of Conference

Central Queensland University. Women in Research. Conference

Usage metrics

CQUniversity

Exports