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How do children with different levels of self-concept perceive their school activities?

conference contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by X Jiang, L Prosser, Kenneth Hawkins
The study examined children’s perceptions regarding their daily school activities. A total of 33 children aged 11 and 12 with different levels of self-concept were interviewed. The results showed that children’s contentment regarding different school activities was based on fun, enjoyment and satisfaction of their curiosity. Results also showed that children with a high level of total self-concept experienced higher levels of contentment in some of their school subjects, significantly higher in two particularly demanding subjects – mathematics and project - than their counterparts with a low level of total self-concept. Children with a high physical ability self-concept appeared to enjoy physical education and sports more than the other children. In addition, the children appeared to judge the level of importance of school subjects according to their educational, health or pragmatic value, both present and future. They were well aware of the educational value of schooling. However, the level of importance was reduced greatly in some children's eyes when the subjects carried little or not enough fun and enjoyment, particularly children with very low self-concept scores. This group appeared to be influenced by the intrinsic reward of the subjects rather than external benefits.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Start Page

1

End Page

16

Number of Pages

16

Start Date

01/01/2005

Finish Date

01/01/2005

eISSN

1324-9339

ISSN

1324-9320

Location

Parramatta, N.S.W.

Publisher

Australian Association for Research in Education

Place of Publication

Melbourne, Vic.

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Conference; K.I.D.S. Foundation; Melbourne International Campus; University of Ballarat;

Era Eligible

Yes

Name of Conference

Australian Association for Research in Education. Conference.

Exports

CQUniversity

Exports