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Federated searching_ Is the death toll sounding for information literacy_ Do we really want to Google™ our libraries.pdf (54.13 kB)

Federated searching: Is the death toll sounding for information literacy? Do we really want to "Google"™ our libraries?

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Version 2 2022-05-26, 05:26
Version 1 2017-12-08, 00:00
conference contribution
posted on 2022-05-26, 05:26 authored by Elizabeth Blanchard, Joanne Keleher
Federated search technology provides library users with an avenue to locate information in a similar way to Google™ search. It answers many a frustrated, time pressured users’ prayer by allowing them to search across multiple information resources at the same time. As library professionals, should we embrace this technology and celebrate the simplicity of this search mechanism and the release of information, or should we cringe in fear and write the obituary for information literacy and life long learning? Our library is currently in the process of installing federated searching software. This paper will explore whether the introduction of federated searching could affect the development of information literacy skills in our library users; what impact it will have on the way information literacy is currently taught, and provide an insight into the advantages and disadvantages of using federated search technology in a university library environment.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Start Page

1

End Page

16

Number of Pages

16

Start Date

2006-12-01

Finish Date

2006-12-02

Location

Sydney, Australia

Publisher

Australian Library and Information Association

Place of Publication

Deakin, ACT

Peer Reviewed

  • Yes

Open Access

  • No

External Author Affiliations

Australian Library and Information Association; Division of Library Services; New Librarians' Symposium (4th : 2006 : Sydney, Australia)

Era Eligible

  • Yes

Name of Conference

4th New Librarians' Symposium

Parent Title

New Librarians' Symposium: pathways and possibilities