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Desiccant evaporative cooling systems for Brisbane climate

conference contribution
posted on 22.05.2020, 00:00 by Ramadas NarayananRamadas Narayanan, Edward HalawaEdward Halawa
Air conditioning accounts for up to 40% of the energy use in buildings. Increased air-conditioning system installations not only increase the total energy consumption but also raise the peak load demand. Heatdriven air-conditioning systems use low-grade thermal energy such as solar energy and waste heat – instead of electricity – to provide thermal comfort. This can potentially lead to significant energy saving and reduction in global warming and ozone depletion potentials. Among these systems, the desiccant evaporative cooling system is of particular attention due to its low dew point operation and large capacity range. This paper evaluates the applicability of this technology to the climatic conditions of Brisbane, specifically for the residential sector. Given the subtropical climate of Brisbane where humidity levels are not excessively high during cooling periods, the numerical study shows that such a system can be a potential alternative to the conventional compression based air-conditioning system.

Funding

Other

History

Editor

Russell-Bennett R; Gordon R; Bedggood R

Parent Title

IREE 2019: Conference proceedings and book of abstracts

Start Page

85

End Page

85

Number of Pages

1

Start Date

15/04/2019

Finish Date

16/04/2019

ISBN-13

9781925553130

Location

Brisbane, Qld., Australia

Publisher

Queensland University of Technology

Place of Publication

Online

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Author Research Institute

Centre for Intelligent Systems

Era Eligible

No

Name of Conference

Improving Residential Energy Efficiency Conference (IREE 2019)