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Analogical transfer: Interest is just as important as conceptual potential

conference contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Allan HarrisonAllan Harrison
Analogies and models are frequently used in science and science teaching and much research is devoted to examining their effectiveness. Little research, however. has been conducted into their affective benefits and this paper reviews five studies by the author and his colleagues to find examples of interest enhancing cognition. The rolling wheels refraction analogy, a comparative study of a class that received the wheels analogy and one that did not, two teacher interview studies and the bursting-balloons analogy for molecular shapes are re-examined for instances of motivation and interest contributing to concept learning. The motivational literature insists that conceptual change learning will only proceed when students are interested and engaged. The re-examined analogies and teacher views support this claim. I recommend that a resource of interesting and effective analogies be compiled for teachers, that teachers are encouraged to systematically present their analogies in a model like the FAR guide, and that dedicated research be conducted into the affective aspect of analogy and model-based teaching.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Parent Title

AARE 2002 conference papers

Start Page

1

End Page

17

Number of Pages

17

Start Date

01/12/2002

Finish Date

05/12/2002

eISSN

1324-9339

ISSN

1324-9320

Location

Brisbane, Qld

Publisher

Australian Association for Research in Education

Place of Publication

Melbourne, Victoria

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Conference; Faculty of Education and Creative Arts; TBA Research Institute;

Era Eligible

Yes

Name of Conference

Australian Association for Research in Education Conference