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Airway bacterial interactions and impact on host immune responses

conference contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Jennelle Kyd, Ajay Krishnamurthy, John Mcgrath, Jessica Browne, F Vahedi
The dynamic interactions of the major respiratory microbial pathogens are complex. An understanding of the impact on naturally acquired immune responses to respiratory polymicrobial commensal bacteria is slowly evolving. Maintaining a micro-floral balance and the host's ability to respond to imbalances associated with disease is critical. Studies of acquired immune responses have found that both antibody and cellular immune responses are suppressed by the presence of multiple bacteria when compared with colonization by the single microbe. Microbes interact with the mucosal epithellum through a range of receptor-ligand interactions, including interactions with Toll-like receptors and adhesion molecules. Regulation of the inflammatory response associated with commensal colonization suggests a possible role for Treg cells in controlling the upper air way responses to bacterial microflora with both bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-host interactions affecting colonization and immune responses.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Start Page

116

End Page

120

Number of Pages

5

Start Date

01/01/2011

Finish Date

01/01/2011

eISSN

1662-2847

ISSN

0065-3071

ISBN-13

9783805597227

Location

Asahikawa, Japan

Publisher

Karger

Place of Publication

Basel, Switzerland

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Institute for Health and Social Science Research (IHSSR); Razi Vaccine & Serum Research Institute; TBA Research Institute;

Era Eligible

Yes

Name of Conference

International Symposium on Tonsils and Mucosal Barriers of the Upper Airways