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'Red dirt' schools and pathways into higher education

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posted on 18.07.2018, 00:00 by J Guenther, S Disbray, Tessa BenvenisteTessa Benveniste, S Osborne
One of the predominant themes that pervades much of the literature on remote education is one about Indigenous ‘disadvantage’. It has been defined specifically as ‘the difference (or gap) in outcomes for Indigenous Australians when compared with non-Indigenous Australians’ (Steering Committee for the Review of Government Service Provision 2012, p. xiv). The concept then extends to ‘closing the gap’ (Council of Australian Governments 2009) in a general sense and in a more specific educational context (What Works: The Work Program 2012). Combining ‘Indigenous disadvantage’ with ‘remote’ adds a different meaning – those who live in remote communities are doubly ‘disadvantaged’ because of their geographic location and their race, and indeed some indexes of socio-economic advantage place disproportionate weight on location and race.

History

Editor

Frawley J; Larkin S; Smith JA

Start Page

251

End Page

270

Number of Pages

20

ISBN-13

9789811040627

Publisher

Springer

Place of Publication

Singapore

Additional Rights

CC BY 4.0

Open Access

Yes

Cultural Warning

This research output may contain the names and images of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people now deceased. We apologize for any distress that may occur.

External Author Affiliations

University of South Australia; Charles Darwin University; Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education

Author Research Institute

Appleton Institute

Era Eligible

Yes

Number of Chapters

16