File(s) not publicly available

Transformational leadership and meaningful work

chapter
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by F Walumbwa, A Christensen, Michael MuchiriMichael Muchiri
Over the last three decades, there has been considerable interest in work meaningfulness—the degree to which an employee experiences work as inherently fulfilling and rewarding, judged in relation to an individual’s own ideals or standards (Hackman & Oldham, 1980). Empirical evidence shows that, to the extent that employees experience work meaningfulness, they are more likely to be engaged in their jobs, thereby enhancing their effectiveness and job performance (Arnold, Turner, Barling, Kelloway, & McKee 2007; May, Gilson, & Harter, 2004; Sparks & Schenk, 2001). Therefore, it is important to understand what predicts or makes work more meaningful. Given the dominant role of leadership in the workplace (Avolio, Walumbwa, & Weber, 2009; Avolio, Reichard, Hannah, Walumbwa, & Chan, 2009; Yukl, 2010), one key situational factor that may have substantial impact on meaningful work is leadership.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Start Page

197

End Page

215

Number of Pages

19

ISBN-10

1433813149

ISBN-13

9781433813146

Publisher

American Psychological Association

Place of Publication

Washington, DC

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

TBA Research Institute; W.P. Carey School of Business;

Era Eligible

Yes

Number of Chapters

10