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Restorative justice for domestic and family violence : hopes and fears of Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian women

chapter
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Heather Nancarrow
In 2000, recommendations from two Australian taskforce investigations highlighted opposing views, seemingly reflecting a racial divide, on the utility of restorative justice as a response to domestic violence. Drawing on the literature and semi-structured interviews with Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian women, this chapter explores this apparent racial divide and seeks to explain the incongruence in the taskforce recommendations. The analysis finds the incongruence is centred on the symbolic meaning each group of women attributes to the role of the state, embodied in the criminal justice system, and differing justice objectives. While the non-Indigenous women fear that restorative justice will reinforce the dominant male paradigm, the Indigenous women are hopeful that it can overcome the limitations of the criminal justice system in achieving both gender and racial equality, though this is contingent on elements that do not exist in current restorative justice models.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Editor

Ptacek J

Parent Title

Restorative justice and violence against women

Start Page

123

End Page

149

Number of Pages

27

ISBN-13

9780195335484

Publisher

Oxford University Press

Place of Publication

New York

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Institute for Health and Social Science Research (IHSSR); Queensland Centre for Domestic and Family Violence Research;

Era Eligible

Yes

Number of Chapters

13

Exports