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Citizen science and bears

chapter
posted on 18.02.2020, 00:00 authored by S Elmeligi, Owen NevinOwen Nevin, I Convery
Bears and other large carnivores excite pubic interest and as such might seem like natural candidates for citizen science projects. In reality, however, these charismatic carnivores often live in remote, rugged, difficult terrain; they are often widely dispersed, living at low densities and are cryptic in their habits. Even though public interest in this species is high, the logistics of citizen science projects sometimes render programmes ineffective or too challenging to manage. With thoughtful planning, however, citizen science projects focusing on grizzly bear research can be a positive experience for participants and increase the scope of research databases. As a recent example of this, a 2018 project developed by the Cornell University-based New York Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit is using data collected by citizen scientists to better understand New York's black bear population size and distribution, and how that distribution relates to forest, agricultural, and urban/suburban landscapes and communities (https://iseemammals.org/). In this chapter, we report on an earlier 'bear citizen science' project - Grizzly Research in the Rockies (Elmeligi 2016) - and another more established citizen science programme hosted by Alberta Parks, but first we consider the growth of citizen science.

History

Editor

Nevin OT; Convery I; Davis P

Volume

22

Start Page

199

End Page

209

Number of Pages

11

ISBN-10

1783274603

ISBN-13

9781783274604

Publisher

Boydell Press

Place of Publication

Woodbridge, UK

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

University of Cumbria, UK; Alberta Parks, Canada

Era Eligible

Yes

Number of Chapters

18