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Beyond the Canberra bubble: Rebuilding trust in federal Australia

chapter
posted on 19.04.2021, 23:39 by Jacob DeemJacob Deem, Anne Tiernan
In this chapter, we address these questions through a combination of, first, a consideration of the· approaches to (and failures of) intergovernmental policymaking under prime ministers Malcolm Turnbull and Scott Morrison, and second, public attitude data as captured by Griffith University's Australian Constitutional Values Survey 2008-2017 (ACVS).¹ We find that public dissatisfaction with the way our federal system operates echoes broader observed trends of civic disquiet with Australian politics, but that citizens put differing amounts of faith in federal, state/territory and local levels of government and remain committed to federal ideals. In studying the Morrison and Turnbull prime ministerships, we find a general reluctance to engage with federal issues, much less federal reform. Instead, the preferred approach has been ad hoc and issues-based rather than systemic, an approach that has only exacerbated service delivery failures and the problems of centralism over the last decade. Combining our analysis of public attitudes and prime ministerial politics highlights the urgent need for holistic federal reform, which is necessary to help restore public faith in key tenets of our nation's political system.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Editor

Evans M; Grattan M; McCaffrie B

Start Page

93

End Page

108

Number of Pages

16

ISBN-13

9780522876550

Publisher

Melbourne University Press

Place of Publication

Carlton, Vic

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Griffith University

Era Eligible

Yes

Chapter Number

7

Number of Chapters

30

Parent Title

From Turnbull to Morrison: The trust divide: Australian Commonwealth Administration 2016-2019