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A review of research into problem gambling amongst Australian women

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posted on 12.06.2018, 00:00 by Nerilee HingNerilee Hing, E Nuske, H Breen
Australian women have one of the highest levels of access to gambling of anywhere in the world. Problem gambling amongst Australian women is now a critical public health issue, fuelled by the widespread expansion of electronic gaming machines in casinos and suburban hotels and clubs, growth in alternative gambling products, the liberalisation of social attitudes to gambling, and increased financial and social independence of women. Recent increased access to gambling through the Internet and social media has also diversified women’s experience of gambling problems. However, research into Australian women’s gambling has been minimal, despite concerns about the feminisation of gambling. This chapter aims to review research into problem gambling amongst Australian women, highlighting key findings, limitations, gaps in knowledge, implications, and future research directions. Drawing on three decades of Australian research, including prevalence studies, in-depth qualitative studies and clinical studies, women’s gambling behaviour, motivations, problem gambling, help-seeking, treatment and support are examined. Comparisons between male and female problem gamblers, and between female recreational and female problem gamblers, will highlight distinctive aspects of women’s problem gambling. This review will deepen understanding, inform gambling policy and public health and clinical responses, and facilitate international comparisons.

History

Editor

Bowden-Jones H; Prever F

Parent Title

Gambling disorders in women: An international female perspective on treatment and research

Start Page

235

End Page

246

Number of Pages

12

ISBN-13

9781138188310

Publisher

Routledge

Place of Publication

London, England

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Southern Cross University

Era Eligible

Yes

Edition

1

Number of Chapters

20

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